Body shape, beyond weight, drives fat stigma for women

Fat stigma in women contributes to poor medical outcomes and negatively affects educational and economic opportunities. A new study from scientists at Arizona State University and Oklahoma State University shows that body shape, beyond overall weight, drives fat stigma. Women with overweight and obesity who carry gluteofemoral fat were less stigmatized than those who carry abdominal fat. These findings could affect how interventions for overweight and obesity are designed and delivered.

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Study Aims to Break the Chains of Incarceration in African American Males

The majority of African American men return to prison within one to three years of their first release. A study explores why re-entry programs are not as effective for them when compared to others. Researchers suggest a holistic approach that addresses psychological and historical trauma in conjunction with the environmental factors that perpetuate the stigma justice-involved African American men experience. The approach accounts for negative associations developed in the centuries of oppression and segregation that shape their current societal interactions.

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COVID misinformation a roadblock to curbing pandemic

Two new studies suggest that the spread of misinformation about COVID-19 will make it harder for communities to bring the pandemic under control.
The first found that stereotypes and fears of stigma may be barriers to COVID testing. The other found that believing in COVID conspiracies makes people less likely to support public health policies to reduce the spread of the virus.

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How a foreign market entry fails: the case of Guggenheim Helsinki

Researchers at the Aalto University School of Business followed the Guggenheim Helsinki project closely for several years: they interviewed different parties, observed meetings and analysed news related to the project. According to the researchers, Guggenheim’s conquest of Helsinki failed due to a long political struggle that effectively produced stigma.

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Why Are Men So Negatively Impacted by Depression?

Anxiety, worry and depression are natural responses to the coronavirus pandemic and all of the problems that accompany it. Paul Ingram, in Texas Tech University’s Department of Psychological Sciences, said the impact on men might be more serious than for women because of how men deal with mental health.

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Reducing the epilepsy treatment gap in Pakistan: Start small, stay flexible, never give up

In retrospect, Pakistan’s effort to reduce the treatment gap can appear painstakingly planned, like the blueprints for a shopping complex or a neighborhood. But the secret of the country’s success is not rooted in elaborate planning. Nor did it rely on generous funding or government support.

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Epilepsy is a threat to public health, says international report

Worldwide, more than 50 million people are living with epilepsy. As many as 37 million are not receiving treatment, though it can cost as little as US$5 a year and eliminates seizures about two-thirds of the time. These findings and many others are published in “Epilepsy: A public health imperative”, a report produced by ILAE, the World Health Organization and the International Bureau for Epilepsy.

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Epilepsy is a threat to public health, says international report

Worldwide, more than 50 million people are living with epilepsy. As many as 37 million are not receiving treatment, though it can cost as little as US$5 a year and eliminates seizures about two-thirds of the time. These findings and many others are published in “Epilepsy: A public health imperative”, a report produced by ILAE, the World Health Organization and the International Bureau for Epilepsy.

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