Suspended studies and virtual lab meetings: How the COVID-19 pandemic is affecting epilepsy researchers

How was epilepsy research forced to morph during the first few months of the COVID-19 pandemic? Researchers from 11 countries shared their experiences and thoughts on the future of laboratory research, clinical trials, and in-person conferences.

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The Fate of Germany’s Leadership, With Constanze Stelzenmüller

Constanze Stelzenmüller, Kissinger Chair on Foreign Policy and International Relations at the Library of Congress and senior fellow in the Center on the United States and Europe at the Brookings Institution, sits down with James M. Lindsay to discuss German politics and the future of Germany’s leadership.

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Rethinking mortality and how we plan for old age

Many people dream of comfortably living out their golden years. A new IIASA study however shows that older Europeans, and especially women, frequently underestimate how many years they have left, which could lead to costly decisions related to planning for their remaining life course.

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How a Magnet Could Help Boost Understanding of Superconductivity

Physicists have unraveled a mystery behind the strange behavior of electrons in a ferromagnet, a finding that could eventually help develop high temperature superconductivity. A Rutgers co-authored study of the unusual ferromagnetic material appears in the journal Nature.

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Most Men Do Not Regret their Choices for Prostate Cancer Surgery

Men with localized prostate cancer are faced with deciding among a range of options for treatment – including a choice between robot-assisted versus conventional prostatectomy. A new follow-up study in The Journal of Urology® finds that most patients choosing surgery for prostate cancer don’t regret their decisions. The Journal of Urology®, Official Journal of the American Urological Association (AUA), is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

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U.S. protections for constitutional rights falling behind global peers

New research from the WORLD Policy Analysis Center at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health (WORLD) shows that the United States is falling behind its global peers when it comes to guarantees for key constitutional rights. Researchers identified key gaps in the U.S. including guarantees of the right to health, gender equality, and rights for persons with disabilities.

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How Planets May Form After Dust Sticks Together

Scientists may have figured out how dust particles can stick together to form planets, according to a Rutgers co-authored study that may also help to improve industrial processes. In homes, adhesion on contact can cause fine particles to form dust bunnies. Similarly in outer space, adhesion causes dust particles to stick together. Large particles, however, can combine due to gravity – an essential process in forming asteroids and planets. But between these two extremes, how aggregates grow has largely been a mystery until now.

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