Study Helps Unravel Why Young, Pregnant Women Develop Heart Failure Similar to That of Older Patients

Researchers at Penn Medicine have identified more genetic mutations that strongly predispose younger, otherwise healthy women to peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM), a rare condition characterized by weakness of the heart muscle that begins sometime during the final month of pregnancy through five months after delivery. PPCM can cause severe heart failure and often leads to lifelong heart failure and even death.

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Research shows race is a factor in disparities of symptom prevalence and response to treatment in multiple sclerosis treatment

Black and Hispanic patients develop more disabilities from multiple sclerosis (MS) and respond to treatments for the disease differently compared to white patients who also have the disease, according to recent findings by researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) at the Americans Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis Forum 2021.

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Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Mark Pimentel, MD

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common gastrointestinal disorder, affecting 10-15% of the world’s population. Approximately two-thirds of those who suffer from IBS are women. The disease can have mild forms or cause severe debilitation as diarrhea alternates with constipation. Severe cramping and bloating also are common. Because chronic IBS is so debilitating, it often disrupts the daily lives of people with this disorder.

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Finding What Makes Catalysts Tick

Computational chemist Samantha Johnson, who is searching for combinations to bolster energy future, is among the PNNL scientists preparing to move into the Energy Sciences Center. The new $90 million, 140,000-square-foot facility, is under construction on the PNNL campus and will accelerate innovation in energy research using chemistry, materials science, and quantum information sciences to support the nation’s climate and clean energy research agenda.

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Microplastics and human health: FSU researchers find exposure to microplastics may alter cellular function

Pollution from miniscule pieces of plastic, or microplastics, have been a growing concern for scientists, public health advocates and environmentalists as these nondegradable items have increasingly made their way into waterways and even the air we breathe. Now, scientists are showing that they might be altering cellular function.

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Fetal intervention research team studies new regenerative patch as treatment for spina bifida

A fetal intervention team led by Ramesha Papanna, MD, MPH, of The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) has received a $3.2 million award from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for preclinical research on a new approach to repair spina bifida in utero.

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Without major changes, gender parity in orthopaedic surgery will take two centuries

At the current rate of change, it will take more than 200 years for the proportion of women in orthopaedic surgery to reach parity with the overall medical profession, according to a study in Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research® (CORR®), a publication of The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons®. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

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New Approach Helps Determine How Much Microbial Community Composition Is Driven by Selection and How Much by Chance

Quantifying the relative importance of natural selection, migration, and random shifts to a species is a major challenge in ecology research, especially for microbes. This study develops an approach named iCAMP that is based on the concept that different processes can govern different groups of species in a diverse community. Applied to grassland microbial communities, iCAMP revealed that environmental changes altered the relative importance of the ecological processes.

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Finding Gene Neighbors Leads to New Protein Functions

As scientists have developed new technologies for gene sequencing, the availability of sequenced genes has grown exponentially, but scientists’ ability to decipher the functions encoded in these sequences has not kept pace. In this study, researchers working with green algae discovered that physically clustered genes in eukaryotic genomes can be maintained over hundreds of millions of years. This phenomenon can help predict function.

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Sleep disorders and surgery: Anesthesia & Analgesia marks first decade of the Society of Anesthesia and Sleep Medicine

An estimated 50 million people undergo surgery each year in the United States, and a significant proportion of them have undiagnosed or untreated sleep disorders (SD) or sleep-disordered breathing (SDB). Issues at the intersection of anesthesiology and sleep medicine are the focus of the Society of Anesthesia and Sleep Medicine (SASM) whose 10th anniversary is commemorated in the special theme May issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia.

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Once-A-Week Insulin Treatment Could Be Game-Changing For Patients With Diabetes

DALLAS – April 19, 2021 – Treating people with Type 2 diabetes with a new once-a-week injectable insulin therapy proved to be safe and as effective as daily insulin injections, according to the results of two international clinical trials published online today in Diabetes Care. The studies suggest that the once-weekly treatment could provide a convenient alternative to the burden of daily insulin shots for diabetes patients.

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Mayo researchers, collaborators identify ‘instigator’ gene associated with Alzheimer’s disease

In a new paper published in Nature Communications, Mayo Clinic researchers and collaborators report the protein-coding gene SERPINA5 may worsen tau protein tangles, which are characteristic of Alzheimer’s disease, and advance disease. By combining clinical expertise, brain tissue samples, pathology expertise and artificial intelligence, the team clarified and validated the relevance of the gene to Alzheimer’s disease.

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Mapping Performance Variations to See How Lithium-Metal Batteries Fail

Scientists have identified the primary cause of failure in a state-of-the-art lithium-metal battery, of interest for long-range electric vehicles: electrolyte depletion.

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Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every other Wednesday.

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