Passing crucial, challenging introductory chemistry course gives biggest boost to underrepresented students

Underrepresented students in STEM received lower grades in a general chemistry series compared to their peers and were less likely to continue. But if underrepresented students completed the first course with at least the minimum grade needed to continue, they were more likely than their peers to do so.

Read more

Underrepresented college students benefit more from ‘active learning’ techniques in STEM courses

Switching from passive techniques, such as lectures, to inquiry-based “active learning” methods in college STEM courses has a disproportionate benefit for underrepresented students, which includes low-income students & Latinx, African-American, Native-American, Native-Hawaiian/Pacific-Islander students.

Read more

AIP Task Force Brings Diversity, Inclusion, Systemic Change Report to APS March Meeting

At the American Physical Society March Meeting in Denver, five members of the TEAM-UP task force, chartered and funded by the American Institute of Physics, will outline how faculties, departments and professional societies can promote sweeping changes in physics higher education. Evidence-based recommendations from AIP’s TEAM-UP report will be discussed to highlight the need for increasing the number of African American students obtaining bachelor’s degrees in physics and astronomy.

Read more

Great Neck South Wins Long Island Regional Science Bowls

UPTON, NY—On Thursday, Jan. 30 and Friday, Jan. 31, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory held two back-to-back installments of the Long Island Science Bowl, a regional branch of DOE’s 30th annual National Science Bowl® (NSB). In this fast-paced question-and-answer showdown, teams of students from across Long Island were tested on a range of science disciplines including biology, chemistry, Earth science, physics, energy, and math.

Read more

Wayne State University to address urgent need for STEM educators

Through support from the U.S. Department of Education, Wayne State University announced it is launching the Metro Detroit Teaching Residency for Urban Excellence (TRUE) Project, an innovative multi-sector partnership that aims to positively impact student learning, address the critical shortage of STEM teachers, and support the region’s workforce development. The $2.5 million project will target recent graduates and mid-career professionals with STEM expertise in the metro Detroit region, especially those in the automotive and technology industries who may be impacted by recent and planned plant closures.

Read more