CHOP Researchers Find Elevated Biomarker Related to Blood Vessel Damage in All Children with SARS-CoV-2 Regardless of Disease Severity

Researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have found elevated levels of a biomarker related to blood vessel damage in children with SARS-CoV-2 infection, even if the children had minimal or no symptoms of COVID-19. They also found that a high proportion of children with SARS-CoV-2 infection met clinical and diagnostic criteria for thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). TMA is a syndrome that involves clotting in the small blood vessels and has been identified as a potential cause for severe manifestations of COVID-19 in adults.

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Study Involving Seven Major Children’s Hospitals Shows COVID-19 is Typically Mild in Children

In the largest U.S. study of its kind to date, researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and other PEDSnet sites report that of more than 135,000 pediatric patients tested for SARS-CoV-2 in pediatric health systems, 4% tested positive for the virus. However, the researchers also found patients from ethnic minorities, adolescents, patients with history of public insurance, and those with certain underlying medical conditions were more likely to test positive. More severe disease was seen in 7% of children with positive tests, with similar risk factors.

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Public health experts at DSHS and UTHealth collaborate on nation’s largest COVID-19 serological testing assessment

To help public health professionals and scientists better understand the spread of COVID-19 in Texas and the immune response it causes in individuals, researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) are partnering with the Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) to launch the Texas Coronavirus Antibody Response Survey (Texas CARES). Texas CARES will determine the proportion of people throughout Texas who have COVID-19 antibodies, indicating a past infection and presumably some degree of immune protection.

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Meeting the Challenge: COVID-19 and Back to School

As back-to-school is right around the corner, parents may have questions about how COVID-19 impacts children, especially if your child or a loved one in your home is immunosuppressed due to treatment for cancer or other health conditions. An expert from Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey addresses some of these concerns.

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COVID19: Why Are Children Less Affected?

Why isn’t COVID-19 as hard on children as it is on adults? In sharp contrast to most other viruses, the novel coronavirus doesn’t seem to have the same devastating effect on children that it does on adults. In fact, just the opposite is true, says Pediatric Infectious Disease specialist, Priya Soni, MD. “There is no other respiratory virus that we know, that affects adults so much more severely than infants.”

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Parenting during COVID-19? FSU psychology researchers offer their advice

By: Anna Prentiss | Published: April 20, 2020 | 10:59 am | SHARE: While there is currently no hard data accessible to fully understand the effects COVID-19 has on young children, researchers from the Florida State University Department of Psychology feel that children seem to be coping, on average, quite well during this time.

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UW team illustrates the adverse impact of visiting ‘just one friend’ during COVID-19 lockdown

“What’s the harm in visiting just one friend?” A lot of people are asking that during times of social distancing. A new website illustrates how doing so would essentially reconnect most households in a community and provide conduits through which the COVID-19 virus could spread.

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UNH Experts Offer Tips To Help Parents More Smoothly Shift to Online Learning

As the coronavirus continues to spread, children are transitioning to virtual learning that can be done safely at home. Teachers have been tasked with preparing online lessons and students and parents may be facing apprehension moving into a brave new world of education. Experts at the University of New Hampshire say the most important thing to do is to take a deep breath and stay calm.

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