A new type of defibrillator met safety, effectiveness goals in global clinical study

A new type of extravascular implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) using a lead (thin wire) placed behind the sternum met safety and effectiveness goals for participants in a premarket global clinical study. The device effectively terminated acute and chronic life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. The findings were presented during a late-breaking session at the European Society of Cardiology Congress and were simultaneously published in The New England Journal of Medicine.

Mark Mascarenhas, M.D., who implanted the first dual-chamber leadless pacemakers at Jersey Shore University Medical Center, is available to speak to media

The cardiovascular team at Hackensack Meridian Jersey Shore University Medical Center recently implanted New Jersey’s first dual-chamber leadless pacemaker systems in patients, as part of Abbott’s AveirTM DR i2i clinical study.   People who experience a slower-than-normal heart rate may receive…

New Jersey’s First Dual-Chamber Leadless Pacemakers Implanted at Jersey Shore University Medical Center

The cardiovascular team at Hackensack Meridian Jersey Shore University Medical Center recently implanted New Jersey’s first dual-chamber leadless pacemaker systems in patients, as part of Abbott’s AveirTM DR i2i clinical study.

Alexa, do I have an irregular heart rhythm? First AI system for contactless monitoring of heart rhythm using smart speakers

University of Washington researchers have developed a new skill for a smart speaker that for the first time monitors both regular and irregular heartbeats without physical contact.

Controlling Cardiac Waves with Light to Better Understand Abnormally Rapid Heart Rhythms

Over 300,000 people die each year in the U.S. due to sudden cardiac death. In many cases, sudden cardiac death is caused by abnormally rapid heart rhythms called tachycardias, which means the heart cannot pump adequate blood to the body. In Chaos, researchers use mice to study tachycardias and find there are intrinsic mechanisms that exist in heart tissue that they hypothesize lead to the self-termination of rapid cardiac rhythm.