What’s the Best Sunscreen for Kids?

How to choose the best—and safest—sunscreen for your child. Fun in the sun is a year-round activity in Southern California. But all that sunshine means it’s critical to protect your child (and yourself) from the sun’s harmful rays. “One or more blistering sunburns in childhood can more than double your chances of developing melanoma later on,” says Minnelly Luu, MD, a pediatric dermatologist at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles.

6 skin biopsy wound care tips from dermatologists

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer. It is estimated that one in five Americans will develop skin cancer in their lifetime. As Skin Cancer Awareness Month continues, it’s important to check your skin regularly, and if you notice a spot on your skin that is different from others or that changes, itches, or bleeds, make an appointment to see a board-certified dermatologist.

New survey reveals most Americans say sun protection is more important now than five years ago, yet many misunderstand how to protect themselves

In a recent survey of more than 1,000 U.S. adults, the American Academy of Dermatology found that while respondents gave themselves high ratings for sun protection and most reported that sun protection is more important to them now than it was five years ago, there’s still a lot they don’t know about how to protect themselves from the sun and the risks of sun exposure, including skin cancer —the most common cancer in the U.S.

Skin cancer expert available during Melanoma Awareness Month and as summer approaches

As summer approaches and outdoor activities increase, cancer expert William Wooden, M.D., reminds everyone to practice sun safety to protect against skin cancer. Wooden specializes in melanoma research at Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Comprehensive Cancer Center and is…

How to Check Your Nails for Melanoma

When checking the body for signs of skin cancer, many people may only think to check their skin. However, board-certified dermatologists from the American Academy of Dermatology say it’s important to check the nails, too. Although rare, skin cancer, including melanoma — the deadliest form of skin cancer — can develop under and around the fingernails and toenails.

Experts from Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey Comment on Skin Cancer and Sun Protection

New Brunswick, N.J., April 29, 2021 – According to the National Cancer Institute (NCI), skin cancer is the most common type of cancer. While we all want to enjoy the outdoors, increased exposure to ultraviolet (UV) rays from the sun…

TELL “SKIN CANCER, TAKE A HIKE!™” DURING STEPS CHALLENGE FOR SKIN CANCER AWARNESS MONTH

Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the United States, affecting one in five Americans during their lifetime. To help raise awareness of skin cancer prevention and detection, the American Academy of Dermatology will host Skin Cancer, Take a Hike!™, a month-long steps challenge, beginning Sat., May 1 in recognition of Skin Cancer Awareness Month. The participant-driven fundraising event — part of the AAD’s SPOT Skin Cancer™ campaign to create a world without skin cancer — aims to log 9,500 miles across the country in honor of the approximately 9,500 people who are diagnosed with skin cancer every day.

Tanning Beds and Skin Cancer: Heeding the Call to Action

Public health officials and researchers have become increasingly concerned about the health risks posed by indoor tanning. Researchers at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey recently addressed the importance of increasing efforts to limit indoor tanning among minors in a viewpoint paper published in the April 28 2021 online edition of JAMA Dermatology.

How the Pandemic Has Exacerbated Rates of Skin Cancer

With summer approaching and more and more people getting vaccinated for COVID-19, many San Diegans eagerly anticipate the season best known for outdoor activities. But with more time in the sun comes the need for sun-safe practices. During the pandemic,…

SURVEY: 60% OF AMERICANS SAY THEY HAVE GOTTEN SUNBURNED SO BADLY THEIR CLOTHES WERE UNCOMFORTABLE

Memorial Day — long considered the unofficial start of summer in the U.S. — is quickly approaching, and dermatologists from the American Academy of Dermatology are urging Americans to practice safe sun as they head outdoors, especially as shelter-in-place measures related to COVID-19 begin to lift. Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the U.S., affecting one in five Americans in their lifetime, yet new data from the AAD shows that many Americans aren’t protecting themselves from the sun’s harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays.

NEW AMERICAN ACADEMY OF DERMATOLOGY SURVEY FINDS MOST AMERICANS KNOW SUN PROTECTION IS IMPORTANT, YET MANY AREN’T PROTECTING THEMSELVES

As more Americans head outdoors for warmer weather and fresh air amid “shelter-in-place” measures, dermatologists from the American Academy of Dermatology have an important reminder: practice safe sun. Skin cancer is one of the most preventable types of cancer, but new data from the AAD shows that many Americans aren’t taking the necessary steps to protect themselves.