ALMA Makes First-Ever Detection of Gas in a Circumplanetary Disk

Scientists using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA)— in which the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) is a partner— to study planet formation have made the first-ever detection of gas in a circumplanetary disk. What’s more, the detection also suggests the presence of a very young exoplanet.

ALMA obtiene vista privilegiada de duelo entre fuerzas opuestas en incubadora de Gran Nube de Magallanes

Tras usar el Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) para observar regiones donde se forman estrellas en la Gran Nube de Magallanes, un equipo de investigación descubrió la existencia de un turbulento fenómeno de tira y afloja en la incubadora 30 Doradus. Las observaciones revelaron que, a pesar de una intensa retroalimentación estelar, la gravedad está incidiendo en la forma de la nube molecular y, contra todo pronóstico, fomentando la formación de estrellas jóvenes y masivas. Los resultados de las observaciones se presentaron hoy en una conferencia de prensa durante la asamblea n.o 240 de la Sociedad Astronómica Estadounidense (AAS, en su sigla en inglés), celebrada en Pasadena (California, EE. UU.), y se publicarán la revista The Astrophysical Journal (ApJ).

ALMA gets front-row seat to an ongoing star-formation standoff in the Large Magellanic Cloud

While using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) to observe large star-forming regions in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), scientists discovered a turbulent push-and-pull dynamic in the star-forming region, 30 Doradus. Observations revealed that despite intense stellar feedback, gravity is shaping the molecular cloud, and against scientific odds, is driving the ongoing formation of young, massive stars. The observations were presented today in a press conference at the 240th meeting of the American Astronomical Society (AAS) in Pasadena, California, and are published in The Astrophysical Journal (ApJ).

Undergraduate Researcher Captures Young Galaxy’s “Coming of Age” and Finds Evidence That Early Galaxies May Be Bigger and More Complex Than We Thought

Scientists using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA)— an international observatory co-operated by the US National Science Foundation’s National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO)—have observed a significant amount of cold, neutral gas in the outer regions of the young galaxy A1689-zD1, as well as outflows of hot gas coming from the galaxy’s center. These results may shed light on a critical stage of galactic evolution for early galaxies, where young galaxies begin the transformation to be increasingly like their later, more structured cousins. The observations were presented today in a press conference at the 240th meeting of the American Astronomical Society (AAS) in Pasadena, California, and will be published in an upcoming edition of The Astrophysical Journal (ApJ).

Scientists on the Hunt for Planetary Formation Fossils Reveal Unexpected Eccentricities in Nearby Debris Disk

Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), astronomers have imaged the debris disk of the nearby star HD 53143 at millimeter wavelengths for the first time, and it looks nothing like they expected. Based on early coronagraphic data, scientists expected ALMA to confirm the debris disk as a face-on ring peppered with clumps of dust. Instead, the observations took a surprise turn, revealing the most complicated and eccentric debris disk observed to date.

Equipo científico en busca de fósiles de formación planetaria revela inesperadas excentricidades en disco de escombros cercano

Gracias al Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), un equipo de astrónomos y astrónomas obtuvo la primera imagen de un disco de escombros de la estrella cercana HD 53143 en longitudes de onda milimétricas, y el resultado dista mucho del que se esperaba. Sobre la base de datos coronagráficos, la comunidad científica esperaba que ALMA confirmara que el disco tenía el aspecto de un anillo visto de frente y con aglomeraciones de polvo. En cambio, el estudio reveló el disco más complejo y excéntrico observado a la fecha.

Science Results From NRAO Facilities to Be Presented at Multiple AAS 240 Press Conferences

Seven new scientific results from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), the Very Large Array (VLA), and the Very Large Array Sky Survey (VLASS) will be revealed at multiple press conferences during the 240th meeting of the American Astronomical Society (AAS) between June 13-15, 2022 in Pasadena, California.

Astronomers Reveal First Image of the Black Hole at the Heart of Our Galaxy

At simultaneous press conferences around the world, including at a National Science Foundation-sponsored press conference at the US National Press Club in Washington, D.C., astronomers have unveiled the first image of the supermassive black hole at the center of our own Milky Way galaxy. This result provides overwhelming evidence that the object is indeed a black hole and yields valuable clues about the workings of such giants, which are thought to reside at the center of most galaxies. The image was produced by a global research team called the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) Collaboration, using observations from a worldwide network of radio telescopes.

Scientists Find Elusive Gas From Post-starburst Galaxies Hiding in Plain Sight

Post-starburst galaxies were previously thought to scatter all of their gas and dust—the fuel required for creating new stars—in violent bursts of energy, and with extraordinary speed. Now, new data from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) reveals that these galaxies don’t scatter all of their star-forming fuel after all. Instead, after their supposed end, these dormant galaxies hold onto and compress large amounts of highly-concentrated, turbulent gas. But contrary to expectation, they’re not using it to form stars.

No olviden el surco: científicos usan masa estelar para establecer vínculo entre exoplanetas y discos protoplanetarios

A partir de los datos de más de 500 estrellas jóvenes observadas con el Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA), los científicos descubrieron un vínculo directo entre las estructuras de los discos protoplanetarios (los discos que rodean a las estrellas y donde se forman planetas nuevos) y las características demográficas de los planetas que allí nacen.

Mind the Gap: Scientists Use Stellar Mass to Link Exoplanets to Planet-Forming Disks

Data from 500 young stars observed with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submilliter Array (ALMA) is giving scientists a window back through time, allowing them to predict what exoplanetary systems looked like through each stage of their formation. And it all starts with a link between higher mass stars, disks with gaps in them, and a high occurrence of observed exoplanets.

Study of Young Chaotic Star System Reveals Planet Formation Secrets

A team of scientists using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) to study the young star Elias 2-27 have confirmed that gravitational instabilities play a key role in planet formation, and have for the first time directly measured the mass of protoplanetary disks using gas velocity data, potentially unlocking one of the mysteries of planet formation.

Cosmic cartographers map the nearby Universe revealing the diversity of star-forming galaxies

A team of astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) has completed the first census of molecular clouds in the nearby Universe. The study produced the first images of nearby galaxies with the same sharpness and quality as optical imaging and revealed that stellar nurseries do not all look and act the same. In fact, they’re as diverse as the people, homes, neighborhoods, and regions that make up our own world.