A Climate in Crisis Calls for Investment in Direct Air Capture, News Research Finds

New research from the University of California San Diego explores one possible mode of response to a climate in crisis: a massively funded program to deploy direct air capture (DAC) systems that remove CO2 directly from the ambient air and sequester it safely underground.

Rutgers Experts Available to Discuss Addressing Climate Change, Environmental Protection in 2021

New Brunswick, N.J. (Jan. 12, 2021) – Rutgers University–New Brunswick professors Robert E. Kopp and Pamela McElwee are available for interviews on how President-elect Joe Biden and his incoming administration could strengthen efforts to address climate change and protect the environment. Kopp, a professor in…

New Investments and Research Indicate Multi-Trillion Dollar Market for Climate Restoration Through Carbon-Capture

Climate restoration is the global movement to remove the trillion tons of excess CO2 from the atmosphere to restore our air to preindustrial levels of carbon dioxide and to preserve the Arctic ice. Given the climate emergency, climate restoration is a critical third pillar of climate action, complementing ongoing mitigation and adaptation efforts. New technologies and natural solutions for reducing CO2 levels in the next 30 years already exist and the costs for global-scale implementation are projected to be less than 1-3% of the global annual GDP.

New Investments and Research Indicate Multi-Trillion Dollar Market for Climate Restoration Through Carbon-Capture

Climate restoration is the global movement to remove the trillion tons of excess CO2 from the atmosphere to restore our air to preindustrial levels of carbon dioxide and to preserve the Arctic ice. Given the climate emergency, climate restoration is a critical third pillar of climate action, complementing ongoing mitigation and adaptation efforts. New technologies and natural solutions for reducing CO2 levels in the next 30 years already exist and the costs for global-scale implementation are projected to be less than 1-3% of the global annual GDP.

Scientists Available to Comment on Environmental Impacts of Australian Bushfires

As record wildfires continue to burn in Australia, people are wondering about their long-term impacts, including on the environment. To address these questions, two environmental science experts at IUPUI — Indiana University’s premier urban research campus in downtown Indianapolis —…