Study in mice suggests that expression of estrogen-related gene can impact post-menopausal breast cancer risk and prevention strategies

In a study using a first-of-its kind mouse model of aging that mimics breast cancer development in estrogen receptor-positive post-menopausal women, investigators at Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center and colleagues have determined that over-expression, or switching on of the Esr1 gene, could lead to elevated risk of developing estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer in older women.

Clouds less climate-sensitive than assumed

In a major field campaign in 2020, Dr. Raphaela Vogel who is now at Universität Hamburg’s Center for Earth System Research and Sustainability (CEN) and an international team from the Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique in Paris and the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology in Hamburg analyzed observational data they and others collected in fields of cumulus clouds near the Atlantic island of Barbados.

Subjective Cognitive Decline Linked to Higher Dementia Risk for Black, Latino People

Some people report a decline in their memory before any decline is large enough to show up on standard tests. This experience, called subjective cognitive decline, is associated with an increased risk of later developing dementia in white, Black and Latino people, according to a study published in the November 30, 2022, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

With High Costs and Similar Benefits, Use of New Neurology Drugs Is Low

A number of new neurologic medications for diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS), Parkinson’s disease and migraine have received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval over the past decade. However, with most having higher out-of-pocket costs and benefits similar to existing, less expensive drugs, only a small percentage of people with neurologic conditions are being treated with these new drugs, according to a study funded by the American Academy of Neurology and published in the November 30, 2022, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

CHOP Researchers Identify Potential Genetic Variants Linked to Increased Cancer Risk in Children with Birth Defects

Researchers have identified several genetic variants associated with increased risk of cancer in children with non-chromosomal birth defects, such as congenital heart disease and defects of the central nervous system. While the risk of developing cancer is not as high as children with chromosomal birth defects, it is significantly higher than children with no birth defects at all, and the findings may provide a basis for early detection in these understudied patients.

UCI researchers discover crucial role of brain’s striatum cilia in time perception

Irvine, Calif., Nov. 30, 2022 — Researchers at the University of California, Irvine have discovered that removal of cilia from the brain’s striatum region impaired time perception and judgment, revealing possible new therapeutic targets for mental and neurological conditions including schizophrenia, Parkinson’s and Huntington’s diseases, autism spectrum disorder, and Tourette syndrome.

PET technology more effective than angiogram at determining need for coronary stents, bypass surgery

A new method for determining whether patients with heart disease need coronary stents or bypass surgery is more effective than the angiogram, which is currently used, according to research from UTHealth Houston Heart & Vascular.

Research reveals how a potentially fatal COVID-19 complication damages lung tissue

Mechanisms involved in the rapid, severe progression of fibrosis in the lung tissues of COVID-19 patients, a potentially fatal complication of the virus that damages and scars the lungs, have been uncovered by researchers led by UTHealth Houston.

Controversial Alzheimer’s drug approval sparks surprising impact

Irvine, Calif., Nov. 29, 2022 — When the U.S. Food and Drug Administration gave controversial accelerated approval to the first Alzheimer’s drug in nearly 20 years, it had a surprising impact on attitudes about research into the disease. A survey by University of California, Irvine neuroscientists has found news coverage of the FDA’s decision made the public less willing to volunteer for Alzheimer’s pharmaceutical trials.

Study Shows Paxlovid Can Safely Be Used to Reduce Risk of Severe COVID in People Who Are Pregnant

Findings from a Johns Hopkins Medicine research study published today in JAMA Network Open provide strong evidence that people who are pregnant and have been infected with SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19) can safely take the antiviral drug Paxlovid to reduce the possibility of severe disease.