Shrinking Waveforms on Electrocardiograms Predict Worsening Health and Death of Hospitalized COVID-19 and Influenza Patients

Spotting changes in the heart’s electrical activity may prompt more-aggressive treatment and monitoring.

Researchers and citizen scientists complete first-ever Weddell seal count

A research team led by the University of Minnesota Twin Cities has completed a first-ever global population estimate of Weddell seals in Antarctica, showing that there are significantly fewer seals than previously thought. Documenting the seals’ population trends over time will help scientists better understand the effects of climate change and commercial fishing.

Unusual visual examination of objects may indicate later autism diagnosis in infants

Unusual visual inspection of objects in infants may precede the development of the social symptoms characteristic of autism syndrome disorder, a UC Davis Health study has found.

From Alpha to Epsilon: Consortium study illuminates surfaces of Spike most resistant to antibody escape

Scientists at La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) have published a detailed map of where human antibodies bind to SARS-CoV-2, a map that was generated by a global collaboration comparing nearly all leading clinical candidates. The new research will guide the development of more effective COVID-19 antibody therapies and help scientists develop effective vaccines to address emerging viral variants.

A new solid-state battery surprises the researchers who created it

Engineers created a new type of battery that weaves two promising battery sub-fields into a single battery. The battery uses both a solid state electrolyte and an all-silicon anode, making it a silicon all-solid-state battery. The initial rounds of tests show that the new battery is safe, long lasting, and energy dense. It holds promise for a wide range of applications from grid storage to electric vehicles.

Decoding birds’ brain signals into syllables of song

Researchers can predict what syllables a bird will sing—and when it will sing them—by reading electrical signals in its brain, reports a new study from the University of California San Diego. The work is an early step toward building vocal prostheses for humans who have lost the ability to speak.

Researchers “Watch” Molten Salts Carve Tiny Nooks and Tunnels into Metal Alloys in 3D

A multidisciplinary team of scientists has used the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II), a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User facility located at the DOE’s Brookhaven National Laboratory, to investigate how high-temperature molten salts corrode metal alloys.

Hubble Snapshot of ‘Molten Ring’ Galaxy Prompts New Research

In this image, a remote galaxy is greatly magnified and distorted by the effects of gravitationally warped space. After its public release, astronomers used the picture to measure the galaxy’s distance of 9.4 billion light-years. This places the galaxy at the peak epoch of star formation in cosmic evolution.

Common weight loss operation is safe and effective in children and adolescents 10 years on

Results from a 10-year study of children and adolescents who underwent a common weight loss operation to treat severe obesity show they safely have long-lasting major weight loss and improvement of their obesity-related medical problems without stunting their growth in height. The study, involving the longest known follow-up of pediatric patients after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, is published online by the Journal of the American College of Surgeons ahead of print.

Active Living After Cancer program improves physical functioning of breast cancer survivors

Breast cancer survivors who participated in Active Living After Cancer, an evidence-based 12-week group program, markedly increased their physical activity and ability to accomplish the basic pursuits of daily life, researchers from The University of Texas
MD Anderson Cancer Center reported today in Cancer.

Corticosteroid injections of hip linked to ‘rapidly destructive hip disease’

Corticosteroid injections are a common treatment option for pain and inflammation in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip. But a new study adds to concerns that hip steroid injections may lead to increased rates of a serious complication called rapidly destructive hip disease (RDHD), according to a paper in The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio in partnership with Wolters Kluwer.

Are Too Many Phase III Cancer Clinical Trials Set Up to Fail?

New research in JNCCN finds four out of five cancer therapies tested in Phase III trials do not achieve clinically-meaningful benefit in prolonging survival, and is the first study to quantify the number of false-positive, false-negative, and true-negative trial results.

Rutgers Cancer Institute Research: Abdominal Fat Linked to Worse Outcomes for Black Breast Cancer Survivors

Findings from a recent population based cohort study published online in JAMA Oncology show that Black women diagnosed with breast cancer who also have central obesity, which means excess body fat in the abdominal area, were more likely to die from breast cancer or any other cause than similar women who didn’t have central obesity.