U.S. Autism Rates Up 10 Percent in New CDC Report

Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health contributed to a new U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report that finds the prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) among 11 surveillance sites as 1 in 54 among children aged 8 years in 2016 (or 1.85 percent).

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As Millions Set Up Work-from-Home Offices for the First Time, Baylor Expert Tells How to Make a Smooth Transition

The spread of coronavirus has interrupted many traditional institutions of working life, with perhaps the most drastic change to the professional environment coming from the rapid transition to work-from-home offices. With many segments of the workforce ordered to shelter in place and work remotely, employees have scrambled to transform guest bedrooms and kitchen tables to home offices, exchanging conference room roundtable discussions for tiled video conference calls.

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New framework will help decide which trees are best in the fight against air pollution

A study from the University of Surrey has provided a comprehensive guide on which tree species are best for combatting air pollution that originates from our roads – along with suggestions for how to plant these green barriers to get the best results.

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How Stable is Deep Ocean Circulation in Warmer Climate?

If circulation of deep waters in the Atlantic stops or slows due to climate change, it could cause cooling in northern North America and Europe – a scenario that has occurred during past cold glacial periods. Now, a Rutgers coauthored study suggests that short-term disruptions of deep ocean circulation occurred during warm interglacial periods in the last 450,000 years, and may happen again.

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