Study Finds Pre-procedure CT Imaging Beneficial for Left Atrial Appendage Occlusion Cases

DETROIT (June 30, 2022) – Findings of a Henry Ford Health study published in the Journal of American Heart Association from researchers in the Center for Structural Heart Disease (Division of Cardiology and Division of Radiology) show Henry Ford’s pioneering use of 3D Computed Tomography (CT) imaging for planning left atrial appendage occlusion (LAAO) is associated with higher successful device implantation rates, shorter procedural times, and less frequent changes in device sizes.

Global contrast media shortage: Strategies for conservation

In wake of the global shortage of iodinated contrast media, researchers modeled several ways to conserve it. They found that a combination of methods could reduce contrast media use for CT scans by approximately 80% if a moderate reduction in diagnostic accuracy could be tolerated. They say changes must be made to minimize supply chain risk in the future.

Romantic partners can influence each other’s beliefs and behaviors on climate change, new Yale study finds

Few would argue that romantic partners have the potential to shift each other’s beliefs and behaviors, but what about their views on climate change specifically? Up until now there’s been little analysis of the dynamics of climate change conversations in romantic relationships and how the beliefs of one partner can influence the other.

Tandon team captures an elusive shadow: state-by-state gun ownership

Policy-makers are faced with an exceptional challenge: how to reduce harm caused by firearms while maintaining citizens’ right to bear arms and protect themselves. This is especially true as the Supreme Court has hobbled New York State regulations restricting who can carry a concealed weapon.

Most New Jersey Parents Support Depression Screening in Schools, But They Have Some Concerns

A majority — more than 75 percent — of New Jersey parents of middle and high school students recognize the benefits of screening and early detection of depression risk in adolescents but many express concerns about potential unintended consequences of screening, according to a survey of New Jersey parents and guardians of children ages 12 to 18.

Climate change may be culprit in Antarctic fish disease outbreak

Climate change might be behind an unusual disease outbreak among Antarctic fish. For about a decade, University of Oregon biologists John Postlethwait and Thomas Desvignes have been visiting the West Antarctic Peninsula. They study a unique group of fish that has adapted to the harsh polar environment. But on a 2018 field excursion, they noticed something especially strange: a large number of those fish were afflicted with grotesque skin tumors.

Under 30 Percent of U.S. Kids Have High Scores for Heart Health

Most children and adolescents living in the U.S. have suboptimal scores for cardiovascular health (CVH), according to the first study to use the American Heart Association’s new “Life’s Essential 8” metrics and scoring algorithm for quantifying CVH levels in adults and children. Overall, under 30 percent of 2-19-year-olds had high CVH. The proportion of children with high CVH declined markedly with older age: 56 percent of 2-5-year-old children had high CVH, compared with 33 percent of 6-11-year-olds and 14 percent of 12-19-year-olds.

Awake prone positioning does not offer benefit in reducing intubation for COVID-19 induced acute respiratory failure

A large multicenter, randomized clinical trial revealed no difference in the risk of endotracheal intubation requirement at 30 days between awake prone positioning and standard positioning for patients with COVID-19 who suffered from acute hypoxemic respiratory failure, according to research published in JAMA by researchers at UTHealth Houston.

Measuring Levels of Proteins in Eye Fluid May Accurately Predict Need for Lifelong Macular Degeneration Therapy

In a study of eye fluid from 38 patients, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have found that levels of a specific protein appears to help accurately predict whether people with the wet form of age-related macular degeneration may need lifelong, frequent eye injections to preserve vision or if they can be safely weaned off the treatments.

Study Examines Data Transparency, Health Equity in U.S. COVID-19 Response

State governments varied widely in COVID-19 pandemic mitigation measures and how they addressed immediate and long-standing health disparities and associated inequities.

Moffitt Study Shows Adaptive Therapy Improves Outcomes, Reduces Care Costs for Prostate Cancer Patients

Researchers in Center of Excellence for Evolutionary Therapy at Moffitt Cancer Center are thinking outside the box and studying an alternative approach called adaptive therapy that is based on evolutionary principles and mathematical modeling. In a new article in eLife, the researchers report updated results from a pilot clinical trial evaluating an adaptive therapy approach using the drug abiraterone to treat patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer.

Eligible younger U.S. adults less likely to meet recommended colorectal cancer screening guidelines and face greater disparities

Younger adults living in the U.S. are less likely to be screened for colorectal cancer than older U.S. adults, despite now being eligible under new screening guidelines, and face greater disparities than older U.S. adults who are eligible for screening, according to research from UTHealth Houston.

Study led by NUS researchers reveals High Mountain Asia hydropower systems are threatened by climate change

High Mountain Asia, the planet’s most extensive icy systems outside the polar regions, have the world’s largest undeveloped hydropower potential and are seeing numerous dams and reservoirs under construction or planning. However, climate change is destabilising the landscapes and threatening numerous hydropower projects according to a new study led by researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS).

These red flags can let you know when you’re in an online echo chamber

Researchers at UC Santa Cruz have identified specific elements of tone and style in online speech that are linked to hyperpartisan echo chambers. These language markers could also prove useful for flagging spaces where disinformation may be likely to emerge.

Physicists confront the neutron lifetime puzzle

To solve a long-standing puzzle about how long a neutron can “live” outside an atomic nucleus, physicists entertained a wild but testable theory positing the existence of a right-handed version of our left-handed universe.

Designed to identify wildlife by sound, the BirdNET app opens new avenues for citizen science

The BirdNET app, a free machine-learning powered tool that can identify more than 3,000 birds by sound alone, generates reliable scientific data and makes it easier for people to contribute citizen-science data on birds by simply recording sounds. Results of tests to measure the app’s accuracy are published in the open access journal PLOS Biology.

Dynamic cells linked to brain tumor growth and recurrence

Tumors are made up of many types of cells, both cancerous and benign. The specific complexity of the cells inside brain tumors has been a trademark of the disease, one that makes treatment extremely difficult. While scientists have long known about the variety of cells within a brain tumor, the ways these tumors grow has relied on the understanding that the cells are static, unmoving and relatively fixed.