Atmospheric Rivers Help Create Massive Holes in Antarctic Sea Ice

Warm, moist rivers of air in Antarctica play a key role in creating massive holes in sea ice in the Weddell Sea and may influence ocean conditions around the vast continent as well as climate change, according to Rutgers co-authored research. Scientists studied the role of long, intense plumes of warm, moist air – known as atmospheric rivers – in creating enormous openings in sea ice. They focused on the Weddell Sea region of the Southern Ocean near Antarctica, where these sea ice holes (called polynyas) infrequently develop during the winter.

Rutgers Expert Can Discuss Cool, Dry May With Snow and ‘Endless Spring’

New Brunswick, N.J. (June 10, 2020) – Rutgers University–New Brunswick climatologist David A. Robinson is available for interviews on the unusually cool May in New Jersey, including  the first measurable May snow in the Garden State since 1977. While many people remark…

Rutgers Expert Available to Discuss Windy, Cool April Weather

New Brunswick, N.J. (May 7, 2020) – Rutgers University–New Brunswick climatologist David A. Robinson is available for interviews on the unusually windy and cool April in New Jersey, as well as the third least snowy season since 1895. “New Jersey’s May weather…