Discovery of ray sperms’ unique swimming motion and demonstration with bio-inspired robot

It is generally agreed that sperms “swim” by beating or rotating their soft tails. However, a research team led by scientists from City University of Hong Kong (CityU) has discovered that ray sperms move by rotating both the tail and…

New dipping solution turns the whole fish into valuable food

When herring are filleted, more than half their weight becomes a low-value ‘side stream’ that never reaches our plates – despite being rich in protein and healthy omega-3 fatty acids. Now, scientists from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have developed…

UN: More harmful algal bloom impacts emerge amid rising seafood demand, coastal development

UNESCO IOC delivers 1st global assessment report after 7 years’ work by 109 experts in 35 countries, creating a baseline to detect and gauge the changing distribution, frequency, and intensity of harmful — often poisonous — algal blooms

New technology ‘listens’ for endangered right whales

One of the world’s most endangered whale species could have added protection from threats posed by human marine activity, through technology developed by the University of East Anglia (UEA). In partnership with the Scottish Association for Marine Science (SAMS) and…

Protect the sea, neglect the people? Social impact of marine conservation schemes revealed

As G7 governments renew commitments to protecting marine spaces and biodiversity, global conservation initiatives such as 30×30 are feared to pay too little attention to the livelihood impacts on communities Close-up inspection of an upcoming marine conservation area in Cambodia…

Plastic in Galapagos seawater, beaches and animals

Plastic pollution has been found in seawater, on beaches and inside marine animals at the Galapagos Islands. A new study – by the University of Exeter, Galapagos Conservation Trust (GCT) and the Galapagos Science Center – found plastic in all…

NTU Singapore scientists turn aquaculture waste into new biomaterial for tissue repair

Scientists at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed a new biomaterial made entirely from discarded bullfrog skin and fish scales that could help in bone repair. The porous biomaterial, which contains the same compounds that are predominant in…

Biodiversity devastation: Human-driven decline requires millions of years of recovery

A new study shows that the current rate of biodiversity decline in freshwater ecosystems outcompetes that at the end-Cretaceous extinction that killed the dinosaurs: damage now being done in decades to centuries may take millions of years to undo. The…

The CNRS 2021 Innovation Medal laureates

Antoine Aiello, Nora Dempsey, François Jérôme and Amanda Silva Brun are the four recipients of the CNRS 2021 Innovation Medal. Created 10 years ago, this distinction honours people whose outstanding research has led to significant technological, economic, therapeutic or social…

International study shows alternative seafood networks provided resiliency during pandemic

Local alternative seafood networks (ASNs) in the United States and Canada, often considered niche segments, experienced unprecedented growth in the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic while the broader seafood system faltered, highlighting the need for greater functional diversity in…

Environmental antimicrobial resistance driven by poorly managed urban wastewater

Researchers from Newcastle University, UK, working with colleagues at King Mongkut’s University of Technology Thonburi (KMUTT) in Thailand and the Institute of Urban Environment of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, analysed samples of water and sediment taken from aquaculture ponds…

New insights into close encounters between albatross and fishing vessels

CORVALLIS, Ore. – A novel analysis of encounters between albatross and commercial fishing vessels across the North Pacific Ocean is giving researchers important new understanding about seabird-vessel interactions that could help reduce harmful encounters. The new research method, which combines…

What is killing bald eagles in the U.S.?

Bald eagles, as well as other wildlife, have been succumbing to a mysterious neurodegenerative disease in the southern United States since the 1990s. New research by the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) in Germany and the University of Georgia, USA,…

Stanford economist and others assess aquaculture’s promise and peril

Despite aquaculture’s potential to feed a growing world population while relieving pressure on badly depleted oceans, the industry has been plagued by questions about its environmental impacts. (Watch related video: https:/ / www. youtube. com/ watch?v= DG_nl7-naYo ) But over…