Pew names 9 marine fellows to advance global ocean conservation

Nine distinguished conservation researchers from around the world have been named 2021 recipients of the Pew fellowship in marine conservation. From studying the ecological and socioeconomic benefits provided by coastal habitats to improving shark conservation and coral reef restoration practices, the new fellows will undertake a broad range of projects to deepen our knowledge of the ocean and advance the sustainable use of marine resources.

“We are honored to welcome the newest cohort of experts to the active community of Pew marine fellows,” said Rebecca Goldburg, director of environmental research and science at The Pew Charitable Trusts. “These individuals are undertaking exciting new research projects that will directly address ocean conservation and management needs around the world. I look forward to working with them over the coming years.”

For 25 years, the Pew Fellows Program in Marine Conservation has supported midcareer scientists and other experts seeking solutions to problems affecting the world’s oceans.

Fellows are selected by an international committee of marine science experts following a rigorous nomination and review process. Each fellow receives $150,000 over three years to address some of the most critical challenges facing the marine environment. Pew has recognized 189 marine fellows from 40 countries since the start of the program.

The 2021 Pew marine fellows are:

Amanda Bates, Ph.D.

Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada (through June 30, 2021)

University of Victoria, Canada (starting July 1, 2021)

Bates will examine the long-term impacts of the pandemic lockdown on marine biodiversity to advance scientific understanding of how humans affect natural systems.

Rachel T. Graham, Ph.D.

MarAlliance, Panama

Graham will study shark populations in Panama and explore innovative strategies to strengthen engagement of coastal fishing communities in shark research, conservation, and management.

Gakushi Ishimura, Ph.D.

Iwate University, Japan

Ishimura will examine how fisheries and coastal communities respond to extreme events, such as natural disasters and the COVID-19 pandemic, to inform marine conservation strategies in Japan.

Mei Lin Neo, Ph.D.

National University of Singapore, Singapore

Neo will study threats to populations of giant clams in Southeast Asia to identify key drivers of ongoing declines and opportunities to improve conservation of these threatened invertebrates.

Kirsten L.L. Oleson, Ph.D.

University of Hawaii at Manoa, United States

Oleson will use natural capital accounting to evaluate the contributions of coastal ecosystems to the Hawaiian economy and inform decision-making about and management of marine resources.

Tries Blandine Razak, Ph.D.

IPB University, Indonesia

Razak will undertake research to support more effective restoration and conservation of coral reefs in Indonesia.

Yunne-Jai Shin, Ph.D.

French National Research Institute for Sustainable Development and Marine Biodiversity, Exploitation, and Conservation research unit, France

Shin will develop a comprehensive framework for quantifying uncertainty in ocean ecosystem models to make them more useful as tools for decision-makers.

Rick Stuart-Smith, Ph.D.

University of Tasmania, Australia

Stuart-Smith will develop a system to audit the effectiveness of global marine protected areas in delivering the intended benefits for people and biodiversity.

Wang Songlin, M.Sc.

Qingdao Marine Conservation Society, China

Wang will conduct ecological and socioeconomic research to support effective conservation and management of China’s Bohai Bay eelgrass bed and will work with local fishers to co-develop eelgrass-friendly fishing practices.

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This part of information is sourced from https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2021-03/tpct-pn9033021.php