Understanding the Causes and Costs of Laboratory Turnover

You have vacancies in your lab; most laboratories do.

Some empty slots are for predictable reasons: graduate education, changing fields, downshifting to take care of family responsibilities. However, these aren’t the only reasons, so what’s driving this trend across the industry?

People Don’t Quit Jobs, They Quit Bad Bosses, Right?

We’ve all heard that cliché before, but turns out, it’s not quite true. People leave jobs for any number of reasons, but wages and leadership are lower priorities than you’d think. In fact, the top three tend to be:

  • My work is frustrating
  • My potential is not being utilized
  • Unhealthy organizational culture

Laboratory staff enter their professions for specific reasons. They thrive in the technical environment. They enjoy the challenge of putting all the pieces together to solve a problem. They have a desire to be a part of healthcare and help patients.

They did not sign up for frustration or a lousy culture.

So what are the frustrations that grind away at people, day after day? In many cases, it’s the small things:

  • Leave requests that go unattended
  • Rumors of an unfair or biased scheduling process
  • Having to repeat competency assessments due to incorrect materials
  • Scheduling mixups resulting in unstaffed shifts
  • Understaffed draw stations resulting in high wait times
  • Too much overtime

Lab leadership has waited too long for tools to bring control, transparency and automation to the process of managing staff. StaffReady’s Clinical Workforce Management Software provides cloud-based solutions that automate staff scheduling, competency assessment, and document control for healthcare organizations.

original from https://newswise.net/understanding-the-causes-and-costs-of-laboratory-turnover

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