200 New Doctors, Advanced Practice Nurses to Join Military Medical Ranks Early

More than 200 military medical students and graduate nursing students from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU) will be graduating early to support their colleagues in the U.S. military health system amid the global coronavirus pandemic. USU President Dr. Richard Thomas made the decision when the national emergency was declared.

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Does smoking increase your risk for dementia and cognitive decline?

Scientists from the Uniformed Services University (USU), Emory University and the University of Vermont have found that cigarette smoking is linked to increased lesions in the brain’s white matter, called white matter hyperintensities. White matter hyperintensities, detected by MRI scan, are associated with cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease. These findings may help explain the link between smoking and increased rates of dementia and other forms of cognitive decline.

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Blood Shortage on the Battlefield? Just Make It On-site

A new program launched by the Department of Defense could be the answer to blood shortages on the battlefield, other remote locations, and in hospitals. The Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences’ 4D Bio3 On-Demand Blood Program, or 4D Bio3 Blood, has developed highly efficient protocols and technology to generate red blood cells from stem cells. A key part of this technology is large-scale cell expansion at low cost, producing sufficient red blood cells for treatment in trauma care. This technology is also being adapted to create neutrophils, ultimately allowing for whole blood transfusion using these methods in the future.

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Scientists develop safer, less costly polio vaccine

As the world nears poliovirus eradication, the vaccines themselves have become the greatest threat. In response to a global demand for an effective, safer-to-handle and less costly polio vaccine, scientists at the Uniformed Services University (USU) have developed a new one that could help secure a polio-free world.

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Past trauma exposure, major depression risk factors for suicidal thoughts in deployed Soldiers

Lifetime history of exposure to a traumatic event and self-reported lifetime and current depression are predictive of recent suicide ideation in deployed soldiers, according to a new JAMA Network Open study published January 29, 2020. Researchers suggest that attention to deployment experiences that increase suicide ideation in soldiers with past trauma and major depressive disorder can assist clinicians and leadership in identifying and treating Soldiers at increased risk for suicide.

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First Aid for Severe Trauma Curriculum Being Developed for High Schools

A life-saving course is in development to train high school students around the country how to to deliver the first aid skills for severely injured trauma victims. The education and training course is being created by the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences’ National Center for Disaster Medicine and Public Health (NCDMPH) and The American Red Cross (Red Cross). Students who successfully complete the course will receive certificates documenting their first aid training.

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Blood vessel damage, not nerve damage may be cause for side effects of traumatic brain injury

The effects of a traumatic brain injury (TBI) are pretty clear – problems with memory, headaches, and emotions – but what’s unclear is the underlying pathological causes for those symptoms. According to new research led by researchers at the National Institutes of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) in collaboration with the Uniformed Services University (USU), those underlying pathological causes may actually involve more extensive blood vessel damage than previously known. These findings could help target better treatment of these common injuries.

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Bereaved families of 9/11 victims largely show strong resilience, more than 15 years later

More than 15 years after Sept. 11, 2001, a majority of bereaved family members who lost a loved one in the terrorist attacks that day appear to be healthy and are not reporting symptoms of a mental health condition, while one-third still likely meet the criteria for depression, grief, and anxiety, according to a recent collaborative study led by the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU).

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Facility Dog ‘Shetland’ Helps Next Generation of Health Care Providers

Future military health care providers are learning new ways to care for patients thanks to the help of a two-year-old Golden Labrador Retriever mix named Shetland. The Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU) recently welcomed Shetland as its very own facility dog – making its F. Edward Hébert School of Medicine the first medical school to have a permanent, live-in facility dog.

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