New Cases of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Disproportionately Affecting Americans in Rural Areas New Study Shows

Data from a new study presented this week at The Liver Meeting Digital Experience® – held by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases – found that the rate of new hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cases has slowed since 2009, but only in urban areas. Rural non-Hispanic whites and Blacks have experienced the greatest increases over time when comparing rural and urban HCC trends by specific demographic factors.

UDCA Treatment Lowers Biliary Tract Cancer, Need for Liver Transplantation in PSC Patients

Data from a new study presented this week at The Liver Meeting Digital Experience® – held by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases – found that ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) treatment has significant, positive results for patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), including reduced incidence of biliary tract cancer, reduced mortality and less need for liver transplant.

Improved Center-Specific Practices May Ease Effects of Socioeconomic Deprivation for Pediatric Liver Transplant Recipients

Data from a new study presented this week at The Liver Meeting Digital Experience® – held by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases – found that while neighborhood socioeconomic deprivation is associated with worse adverse long-term outcomes after liver transplant in children, improving center-specific practices can mitigate these effects for young at-risk patients.

Alarming New Study Highlights Need for Improved Access to HBV Vaccination, Testing and Treatment

Data from a new study presented this week at The Liver Meeting Digital Experience® – held by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases – found that in 2019, more than 500,000 persons died of hepatitis B virus infection, highlighting the urgent need for universal HBV vaccination of children beginning at birth, and scaling up testing and access to care and treatment before people with the virus develop life-threatening liver cirrhosis or liver cancer.

New Machine Learning-Based Model More Accurately Predicts Liver Transplant Waitlist Mortality

Data from a new study presented this week at The Liver Meeting Digital Experience® – held by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases – found that using neural networks, a type of machine learning algorithm, is a more accurate model for predicting waitlist mortality in liver transplantation, outperforming the older model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) scoring. This advancement could lead to the development of more equitable organ allocation systems and even reduce liver transplant waitlist death rates for patients.

Unique Coagulation Driven by IL-6 Trans-Signaling Associated with Liver Injury in COVID-19

ALEXANDRIA, VA – Data from a new study presented this week at The Liver Meeting Digital Experience® – held by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases – found that COVID-19 coagulation impairment, driven in part by endothelial Factor VIII, is associated with liver injury in infected patients. The study’s findings also show that IL-6 trans-signaling, which may play a role in COVID-19 development, results in prothrombotic liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) that may mediate the liver injury via elevated Factor VIII and activation of coagulation in the liver microvasculature.

High Abdominal Fat and Low Liver Fat Combo Increases Coronary Heart Disease Risk

Data from a new study presented this week at The Liver Meeting Digital Experience® – held by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases – found that the distribution of a person’s body fat affects coronary heart disease risk, with an increased risk of heart events among people with a combination of high visceral adipose tissue (VAT) – abdominal fat─ and low liver fat. The study’s findings indicate that liver triglyceride regulation plays an important role in heart health in people with discordant visceral adipose tissue and liver fat levels.

More Women Diagnosed with HCV During Pregnancy, but Many Infants Still Not Tested Despite Recommendations from Leading Health Organizations

Data from a new study presented this week at The Liver Meeting Digital Experience® – held by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD)– found that among pregnant women with hepatitis C virus (HCV), more than 25 percent were initially diagnosed during pregnancy screenings, which supports prenatal care as an important opportunity to screen for HCV in women. However, the study also found that less than one third of infants receive appropriate HCV testing, a significant care gap.