UA Little Rock to develop web-based tool to detect social media bots for Navy

In partnership with Kairos Research, the University of Arkansas at Little Rock has been awarded a contract from the U.S. Office of Naval Research to develop a web-based tool and app to detect bot accounts on Twitter.

Read more

Survey Finds American’s Social Media Habits Changing As National Tensions Rise

As national tensions rise, a new national survey of 2,000 people commissioned by The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center finds more Americans are adjusting how they use social media platforms.

Read more

Study: Why U.S. Black Entrepreneurship Lags & How Banks Can Help Fix It

A steady stream of media reports detailing the deaths of unarmed Black Americans at the hands of police. False 911 calls aimed at bringing harm to African Americans engaged in innocuous, everyday activities. Street protests calling for an end to discrimination and police brutality.  As racial tensions swirled this summer, so did calls on social media for those who support the social justice movement for African American civil rights to amplify Black voices and support Black businesses.

Read more

Twitter Data Reveals Global Communication Network

Twitter mentions show distinct community structure patterns resulting from communication preferences of individuals affected by physical distance between users and commonalities, such as shared language and history. While previous investigations have identified patterns using other data, such as mobile phone usage and Facebook friend connections, research from the New England Complex Systems Institute looks at the collective effect of message transfer in the global community. The group’s results are reported in the journal Chaos.

Read more

Computer Vision Technology Helps Analyze Michigan Dam Collapse

New Brunswick, N.J. (June 26, 2020) – Rutgers engineers have created a 3D model of last month’s devastating break in

Read more

New initiative uses data science to confront the growing peril of disinformation

The Governance Lab (The GovLab) at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering announced a partnership with the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development that will focus on addressing a topic of growing public concern: disinformation. The new collaboration is part of The 100 Questions Initiative, an effort to identify the most important societal questions for which greater access to data and data science methods could find answers; in our current climate, some of the most pressing questions involve the spread of deceptive or unproven information.

Read more

COVID-19 and Connectedness: Finding a Balance in Our Online Lives

As uncertainty surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic quarantine wears on, there remains one constant: a reliance on the internet, social media, and streaming services for work, school, entertainment, and keeping in touch with friends and family. But is the increased screen time — and the resulting onslaught of emails, memes, and media consumption that come with the removed barrier between work and home — taking a toll on our mental health? For answers, we turned to Simon Gottschalk, a UNLV sociology professor and author of “The Terminal Self: Everyday Life in Hypermodern Times,” which examines the social and psychological toll of our increasingly online lives on work, education, family life, interactions, our sense of self, and more.

Read more

Harness artificial intelligence and take control your health

Sedentary behaviours, poor sleep and questionable food choices are major contributors of chronic disease, including diabetes, anxiety, heart disease and many cancers. But what if we could prevent these through the power of smart technologies?

Read more

GW Survey Evaluates Influence of Social Media in Attracting Patients

A recent survey from the George Washington University suggests that patients do not take social media into consideration when looking for a dermatologist and recommend that practitioners should use social media as a tool in engaging and educating patients.

Read more

Study finds that uploading photos to social media leaves self-image starving

By: Mark Blackwell Thomas | Published: May 6, 2020 | 1:03 pm | SHARE: Editing and uploading those flattering selfies in the hopes of appearing your best actually leaves you feeling worse and increases the risk of an eating disorder, Florida State University researchers have found. Clinical psychology doctoral candidate Madeline Wick and Professor of Psychology Pamela Keel studied 80 college students’ responses to uploading photos of themselves to Instagram, the dominant photo sharing platform.

Read more

Facebook Study Reveals COVID-19 Compliance and Coping Behaviors of Floridians

The study provides empirical evidence for various aspects of the COVID-19 pandemic as well as important information about associated social, emotional and behavioral factors. Results could assist policy makers on effective decision-making. In addition, depending on the length and time of social isolation, it may become appropriate to explore the influence of COVID-19 on depression, anxiety and stress.

Read more

How Tweets May Influence Substance Abuse in Youth

Substance use by youth remains a significant public health concern. While social media provides youth the opportunity to discuss and display substance use-related beliefs and behaviors, little is known about how posting drug-related content, or viewing posted content influences the beliefs and behaviors of youth relative to substance use.

Read more