Rutgers’ Greg Moore Elected to National Academy of Sciences

Rutgers Professor Gregory W. Moore, a renowned physicist who seeks a unified understanding of the basic forces and fundamental particles in the universe, has been elected to the prestigious National Academy of Sciences. Moore, Board of Governors Professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Rutgers University–New Brunswick, joins 119 other new academy members and 26 international members this year who were recognized for their distinguished and ongoing achievements in original research.

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Gallery of Fluid Motion: Capturing Liquids and Gases in Action

Tears stream down your face. A beer flows down the side of a pint glass. Fluid mechanics is central to understanding the world around us. The beauty of fluid motion was on display last week in Seattle, where more than 3,000 scientists gathered for the 72nd Annual Meeting of the American Physical Society’s Division of Fluid Dynamics. Created in 1987, the Gallery of Fluid Motion (GFM) is the premier visual record of contemporary fluid mechanics.

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Harvesting Fog Can Provide Fresh Water in Desert Regions

Fog harvesting is a potential practical source of fresh water in foggy coastal deserts, and current solutions rely on meter scale nets/meshes. The mesh geometry, however, presents a physiologically inappropriate shape for millimeter scale bulk bodies, like insects.

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Heating Techniques Could Improve Treatment of Macular Degeneration

Age-related macular degeneration is the primary cause of central vision loss and results in the center of the visual field being blurred or fully blacked out. Though treatable, some methods can be ineffective or cause unwanted side effects. Jinglin Huang, a graduate student in medical engineering at Caltech, suggests inefficient fluid mixing of the injected medicine and the gel within the eye may be to blame.

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Shaking Head to Get Rid of Water in Ears Could Cause Brain Damage

Trapped water in the ear canal can cause infection and even damage, but it turns out that one of the most common methods people use to get rid of water in their ears can also cause complications. Researchers show shaking the head to free trapped water can cause brain damage in small children.

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