Room for complexity? The many players in the coffee agroecosystem


The

BioScience Talks podcast

features discussions of topical issues related to the biological sciences.

Agricultural areas are often considered distinct from local ecosystems, and in many cases, such an assessment rings true. Single-crop farmlands, reliant on the liberal use of pest- and herbicides, often limit local biodiversity and species interactions. However, in other agricultural settings, robust ecosystems thrive, intermingled with crops and supporting a diversity of species.

One such acroecosystem is coffee’s. On shade-coffee farms, the coffee plant is consumed by numerous pests, including the green coffee scale, coffee berry borer, and coffee rust disease. In turn, these species are regulated by a variety of natural enemies, through processes of often staggering complexity. In a major


BioScience Overview

article

, John Vandermeer of the University of Michigan and his colleagues aim to untangle such complexities and get at the heart of pest control in the coffee system, emphasizing the intersection of ecology with “the burgeoning field of complex systems, including references to chaos, critical transitions, hysteresis, basin or boundary collision, and spatial self-organization.”

Dr. Vandermeer joins us on this episode of BioScience Talks to discuss the coffee agroecosystem–and the many species and dynamics that underlie it.

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To hear the whole discussion,

visit this link

for this latest episode of the BioScience Talks podcast.


BioScience

, published monthly by Oxford Journals, is the journal of the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS).

BioScience

is a forum for integrating the life sciences that publishes commentary and peer-reviewed articles. The journal has been published since 1964. AIBS is an organization for professional scientific societies and organizations, and individuals, involved with biology. AIBS provides decision-makers with high-quality, vetted information for the advancement of biology and society. Follow BioScience on Twitter

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Oxford Journals is a division of Oxford University Press. Oxford Journals publishes well over 300 academic and research journals covering a broad range of subject areas, two-thirds of which are published in collaboration with learned societies and other international organizations. The division been publishing journals for more than a century, and as part of the world’s oldest and largest university press, has more than 500 years of publishing expertise behind it. Follow Oxford Journals on Twitter

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This part of information is sourced from https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-01/aiob-rfc012320.php

James Verdier
205-286-8626
jverdier@aibs.org
http://www.aibs.org 

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