Research uncovers possible trigger for beginnings of life on Earth as we know it

Approximately 2.4 billion years ago, the Great Oxidation Event, which dramatically increased the oxygen content in Earth’s atmosphere, paved the way for the rise of all lifeforms that use oxygen to break down nutrients for energy. While scientists agree about when the event happened, they are less certain about exactly how it occurred.

Now, however, researchers at Missouri S&T say they’ve discovered a possible trigger for the Great Oxidation Event and the arrival of plants and animals on Earth.

Midwives and nurse-midwives may underestimate the dangers of prenatal alcohol use

Alcohol use during pregnancy can have harmful consequences on the fetus including restricted growth, facial anomalies, and neurobehavioral problems. No amount of alcohol use during pregnancy has been proven safe. Yet a recent survey of midwives and nurses who provide prenatal care showed that 44% think one drink per occasion is acceptable while pregnant, and 38% think it is safe to drink alcohol during at least one trimester of pregnancy.

Discovery enables clear identification of diseased beta cells in type 2 diabetes

BOSTON – (July 29, 2019) – Researchers at Joslin Diabetes Center, an affiliate of Harvard Medical School, have unlocked the key to clearly identifying diseased beta cells in type 2 diabetes. This discovery has both research and therapeutic implications.Studies of diabetes rely on the ability of researchers to sort diseased cells from healthy cells.

UCI, JPL glaciologists unveil most precise map ever of Antarctic ice velocity

Constructed from a quarter century’s worth of satellite data, a new map of Antarctic ice velocity by glaciologists from the University of California, Irvine and NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory is the most precise ever created. Published today in a paper in the American Geophysical Union journal Geophysical Research Letters, the map is 10 times more accurate than previous renditions, covering more than 80 percent of the continent.

Researchers Discover New Combination Therapy to Treat Drug-Resistant Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

Researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have developed a new combination treatment regimen that enhances the immune system’s ability to kill leukemias that do not respond to standard treatments. The regimen includes a therapeutic antibody designed to draw natural killer immune cells to cancer cells.

Study: Sizzling Southwest Summers Can Cause Pavement Burns in Seconds

When temperatures throughout the sizzling Southwestern U.S. climb to over 100 degrees, the pavement can get hot enough to cause second-degree burns on human skin in a matter of seconds. In a new study published in the Journal of Burn Care & Research, a team of surgeons from the UNLV School of Medicine reviewed related admissions to a local burn center – and the temperature on the date of the visit – to determine how hot is too hot.

A Snapshot in Time: Study Captures Fleeting Cell Differences That Can Alter Disease Risk

In cinema and science fiction, one small change in the past can have major, sometimes life-changing effects in the future. Using a series of snapshots, researchers recently captured such so-called “butterfly effects” in heart muscle cell development, and say this…

man holding medicines

Are testosterone-boosting supplements effective? Not likely, according to new research

Over-the-counter “T boosters” are a popular choice for men looking to raise their testosterone levels, and are frequently marketed as being an effective “natural” option. However, new research points toward these supplements as having little or no known effect. LOS…

In Philadelphia’s Mental Health Clinics, Use of Evidence-based Therapies for Youth Psychiatric Treatment is Slow to Catch On, Despite Investments

Intensive Training and Practices with “Proficient Culture” are Critical to Evidence-Based Therapy Use PHILADELPHIA—We all hope—and probably expect—that clinicians use only mental health therapies that are scientifically proven to improve symptoms. A new study from Penn Medicine and Philadelphia’s Department…

A new way to unprint paper using intense pulsed light from a xenon lamp.

New Unprinting Method Can Help Recycle Paper and Curb Environmental Costs

Rutgers-led study shows the benefits of removing toner with pulses of intense xenon light Imagine if your printer had an “unprint” button that used pulses of light to remove toner, curbing environmental impacts compared with conventional paper recycling. A Rutgers-led…